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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - IRI THESys

Gregor Pfalz

Research Assistant
Water science based on climate change

 

  •    Water Science
  •    Climate Change
  •    Environmental Sustainability
     

"Interdisciplinary research is the driving force within the research community. Without the possibility to interconnect with other branches of science and by ignoring the vibrant mechanisms of a problem, the yield of research work will always be diminished. Therefore, during my stay at IRI THESys, I would like to work with other experts from various fields and connect possible starting points." Gregor Pfalz

 

From April to September 2017 Gregor Pfalz was employed as research assistant (substitute for parental leave) at IRI THESys in the research group “Transformations and uncertainties of land-water systems” led by Prof. Dr. Tobias Krüger. Before that, he has studied “Water Management” at the Dresden University of Technology (Technische Universität Dresden).

While his bachelor thesis focused on the temporal accumulation and spatial distribution of PAHs and heavy metal on urban surfaces, during his master’s thesis Gregor has collaborated with the Alfred Wegener Institute – Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research in Potsdam to quantify the amount of sediment and organic matter, derived from the erosion of coastal permafrost due to climate change, into the nearshore zone of the southern Beaufort Sea, Canada.

Additionally to his studies in Dresden, he has stayed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy (NY) for an academic exchange year in environmental engineering and was an intern at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology in Dübendorf, Switzerland.

One major aspect of his work at IRI THESys was to develop a new framework to combine different environmental footprints (e.g. water footprint, carbon footprint, material footprint, etc.) in order to assess the environmental impact of products.

 

THESys Project